Fertility & Assisted Reproduction

 

 

Over 90% of people polled in the United States express a desire to have children. We also know things don’t always go according to plan, and that infertility is among the most isolating experiences. Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive or carry a pregnancy to term after 12 months of trying (6 months if you are over the age of 35), affects approximately 10% of the U.S. population.

When struggling with infertility it can feel as though no one shares your experience, so receiving support through therapy can make a big difference. We understand how fertility challenges and treatments impact not only the physical body, but also various aspects of your identity and emotional wellness. The experience may disrupt notions of gender roles and perceptions of yourself or your partner, may trigger disruption in the sexual relationship, and involves unique complexities and challenges for individuals or couples considering third party reproduction.

Fertility journeys are multifaceted and they can be long, extending well-beyond the acute phases of diagnosis and treatment. We are uniquely attuned to the vulnerabilities that arise for all people experiencing infertility; and we strive to create a supportive and non-judgmental environment in individual and/or couple therapy, engaging you throughout the vast process of grief, loss, and change. Furthermore, we understand that an experience of infertility and the use of assisted reproduction can be risk factors to perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, and we aim to support our clients in receiving care as early in their process as possible as a way to reduce this risk.

We offer support across the wide spectrum of fertility journeys, including:

·      Diagnosis of infertility and the process of fertility treatments

·      Miscarriage

·      Grief & loss

·      Secondary infertility

·      Discontinuing fertility treatments

·      Considering third party reproduction (using donated gametes/embryos/gestational carrier), adoption, childlessness

·      Pregnancy termination

·      Family planning, egg/sperm freezing, and sterilization decisions

·      Unique implications for LGBTQAI individuals and couples

·      Decisions about remaining embryos

More Information:

Resolve: The National Infertility Association

Decisions About Remaining Embryos

Infertility and Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Disorders

American Society for Reproductive Medicine